Question and Answer

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use QUESTION and ANSWER in a Haiku poem. My thoughts quickly went to politicians whose disingenuous questions often elicit reactions that divide and demoralize. I can’t help but believe that the internal walls that we construct are graver than the exterior walls we might consider.   

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku. 

Soul-Hearted Living

I’m honored to introduce Dr. Debra Reble’s beautiful book,  #SoulHeartedLiving. You can create a soul-inspiring 2019 by reading her daily reflections. It’s a perfect gift for friends and family. Several writers are featured through quotes from their books. I’m humbled to be one of those included. ♥  http://www.debrareble.com/shl-book-launch-page/

Sage and Vine

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use SAGE and VINE in a Haiku poem.  I live in a verdant area, and I dearly love seeing cottages covered with vines. Perhaps you think similarly. My poem attempts to capture the wonder of nature’s beauty.  ♥ 

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku. This pinterest photo delights my soul, how about you?

Mourning dove

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use GRASS and DOVE in a Haiku poem.  I live in a wooded area and love the song of doves. Their simple coos bring quiet to my soul. Perhaps you experience the same. ♥ 

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku. 

Discovery

This weekend I finished reading Discovery by Rick and Jan Sikes. It is a quiet book, one that you turn the pages slowly and carefully. It elicits that kind of respect, because each poem is a piece of the writer. I felt as though I was sitting with Rick and Jan, feeling their sorrows, knowing their love, and tenderness overwhelmed me.  

My 5-Star review on Amazon follows: 

Life presents us with challenges none of us would have chosen, and yet, it is through these unwanted hurdles that we can become more fully human. Discovery by Jan and Rick Sikes is a powerful testimony of the human spirit. It is crafted such that the reader accompanies the writers not as a spectator but as a partner. Who hasn’t felt despair, who hasn’t longed for understanding, for truth, for freedom? Each poem walks through the reader’s heart and takes hold of these lonely or fearful parts and brings them to life. Rick and Jan Sikes’ pain becomes your own and the journey very real.

This book lingers and creates vulnerability. Wherever hardness resides, it melts as one poem after another open the doors of the heart. I highly recommend Discovery. It is a journey of the soul. 

Seek and Find

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use SEEK and FIND in a Haiku poem.  I couldn’t help but reflect upon the fact that most of us search for answers to life’s mysteries. Sometimes when we least expect it, we are surprised by an answer.

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku.

the miracle

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use BLUSH and CHASTE in a Haiku poem.  With winter upon us, I am often in awe of its seasonal beauty and respectful of its force. Sometimes it is silence that greets us. 

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku.

A life not lived

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use EXIST and TODAY in a Haiku poem.  As I thought about the two words, I realized how easily one day can slip into the next. Sometimes it can feel as though nothing was achieved.  I wonder, have I simply been asleep? 

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku.

Gratitude for the little things of life

This is the first day of Advent and as well, the beginning of Hanukkah. Holiday songs and colorful lights abound independent of our religious beliefs. For all of us, it is a time of remembrance and celebration, a time we focus on family and friends. During these December days, we remember those we love and often through a gift we say, thank you for being you.

While children excitedly enjoy the magic, most of us wander through stores looking for gifts or delicacies for the family gatherings. Sometimes in the midst of our activity we forget that the season is really about thanksgiving. Why would we not?

When weather threatens us, fires surround us, and elected officials leave us gasping, why would any of us feel gratitude?

If we can step back from our troubled world, we can be overwhelmed by gratitude evoked by a kind word, a helpful hand, a warm embrace, or even unexpected laughter. The little things of life come alive, when we pause long enough to listen to our hearts. Aren’t these little things what is most important in life?  

Sometimes life’s challenges help us value the little things. This year, I’ve been dealing with an ailment requiring a lot of bed rest. It’s been an adventure that I would not have chosen, but I can honestly say that I’m grateful for the experience. I’ve learned so much about love, about life, and about our collective and individual journeys. Most of that learning has come through seeing the little things of life that often go unnoticed.  

Even with the health handicap, much was accomplished. Author John W. Howell and I published The Contract, and to our astonishment, we are ready to send its sequel to the editor. Amazing, right?

Through one challenge or another, life goes on. So it is that I share that I’ve a medical hurdle to tackle over the next couple of weeks. Because of that, I may be absent from social media for a bit. I look forward to wholeheartedly rejoining you in the New Year. Till then, thank you for accompanying me. You have become family and from you, I have learned so much.

I close with a brief but beautiful message from Br. David Steindl-Rast