Remembering…

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use FEATHER and SCREAM in a Haiku poem.  These two words brought me back to youth, my own and that of my kids. We knew how to play when we were young. Maybe we need more pillow fights.  

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku.

Welcome to “THE BUTTON” Blog Tour! @DLFinnAuthor #4WillsPub #RWISA #RRBC

I am excited to welcome author D.L. Finn. I met D.L. through the Rave Reviews Book Club, and we also share membership in RWISA

D.L. is an independent California local, who encourages everyone to embrace their inner child. She was born and raised in the foggy Bay Area, but in 1990 relocated with her husband, kids, dogs and cats to the Sierra foothills in Nevada City, CA.  She immersed herself in reading all types of books, but especially loved romance, horror and fantasy. She always treasured creating her own reality on paper. Finally, being surrounded by towering pines, oaks and cedars, her creativity was cradled until it bloomed. Her creations vary from children’s books, young adult fantasy, adult paranormal romance to an autobiography with poetry. She continues on her adventure with an open invitation to her readers to join her. Today she shares a bit about her most recent book, THE BUTTON

The Button Research
My research is usually limited for fiction, especially when I create my villain. “The Button” required some necessary fact-checking with the story taking place in 1983. Although I lived through this period, I couldn’t remember an exact timeline of when things came out or happened. So, luckily the internet was there to help me out.

First thing I checked was the music. I wanted to make sure that songs I talked about were timely and had been released by September of ‘83—even earlier if club bands were playing the music.

Fashion was another area I researched. Stacy wanted to make a fashion statement by imitating Madonna. Was the timing right for that? I found that Madonna’s popularity started that year, so I limited her influence to lace gloves.

In 1983, you wouldn’t have used a cell phone to contact someone; instead, there were only landline phones and pay phones. What I couldn’t remember was did it still cost a dime to use payphones back then – my research revealed that it did. Was 9-1-1 around at that time? Yes, it was.  TVs were different and much more substantial than they are now, but you could connect it to a format that was making its way into households: a VHS player.) Watching a movie any time
you wanted or recording a show to watch later? Amazing in 83. There were no satellite radio options in a car, so you had to listen to all the commercials unless you had a cassette player (or, as in my case) an 8-track player.

Yes, there are some apparent differences between life now and life thirty-five years ago in music, fashion, and technology, but, you might be wondering why I choose 1983. Although it holds special significance for me because it was the year I got married, I initially planned on using the year 1981.  But, because I wanted to use the quote, “Can I see your papers, please?” from a Clint
Eastwood movie, I pushed the story-line up to 1983 to accommodate that. This quote was something my husband used to say quite often so you can understand why I wanted to use it. He’s almost as big of a fan of quoting movies as Kent is in “The Button.”

I based the opening bar scene off of a few of my youthful observations at a trendy dance club, a biker bar, a rocker bar, and a bar that showcased male strippers. These were the places that would take my “fake’ ID before I was “of age” to drink. I clumped them all together into this fictional bar.

Fact checking was also different in the 80s. If we were sitting around wondering about something, we’d have to look it up in an encyclopedia. There was a hotline, I remember, that offered information– or Ask Your Librarian. It came in handy when we played some of our board games or on those rare occasions that we encountered the know-it-all who was always right about everything.

There was no research required when it came to things that happened to me personally. The eight-hour coma was real and came from my memories, but then it was twisted into the story. I didn’t have a conversation with angels like Lynn did. I did grow up in an alcoholic household where there were parenting issues and a blended family. Lynn Hill’s family bears no resemblance to my real family, including the stepbrother Warren. I added a couple of things, scattered throughout the book that maybe a person or two will recognize. That was for the love and friendships that endured over the years.)

So, know that I always try to get my facts straight now just as I did in the past.

D.L. Finn Links:     
TwitterFacebookInstagramPinterestD.L. Finn blog

Purchase Links: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Smashwords

To follow along with the rest of the tour, please visit the author’s tour page on the 4WillsPublishing site.  D.L. is offering  several giveaways during the tour: 2- “The Button” Kindle Format books, a $5 Amazon Gift Card, and one “The Button” Signed Paperback and Book Marker. If you’d like to book your own blog tour and have your book promoted in similar grand fashion, please click HERE.  

Communication

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use QUESTION and ANSWER in a Haiku poem.  My thoughts focused on communication and our collective failure. It is as though we have lost the ability to simply be honest with one another. What is it that we fear? 

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku.

Fierce Storm

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use FIERCE  and STORM in a Haiku poem. I chose to use the words to describe a common interpersonal situation. Unfortunately, the political climate is such that the divides are deep and the anger overwhelming. I’m not sure what can bridge those differences. 

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku. 

Do and Say

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use DO  and SAY in a Haiku poem. I chose an embattled topic for my haiku. Though I pose a problem with no easy answers, my hope is that someday we won’t have a need for secrets. 

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku. 

Man and Magic

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use MAN  and MAGIC in a Haiku poem. My thoughts of recent have focused on the weather. Its unpredictability and ferocity can change lives. And yet, often hidden in its fury is extraordinary beauty. My Haiku is about that reality.

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku. 

He Said, She Said

Author Colleen Chesebro offers a weekly poetry challenge, using the 5/7/5/7/7 syllable structure.  The words for this week are Cold and Storm. By her rules, a participant cannot use these two words but must use synonyms.

This is my first attempt at writing Tanka, and I’ve chosen to use Tempest and Chill. Thank you, author Jan Sikes for your encouragement and inspiration.

Question and Answer

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use QUESTION and ANSWER in a Haiku poem. My thoughts quickly went to politicians whose disingenuous questions often elicit reactions that divide and demoralize. I can’t help but believe that the internal walls that we construct are graver than the exterior walls we might consider.   

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku. 

Sage and Vine

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use SAGE and VINE in a Haiku poem.  I live in a verdant area, and I dearly love seeing cottages covered with vines. Perhaps you think similarly. My poem attempts to capture the wonder of nature’s beauty.  ♥ 

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku. This pinterest photo delights my soul, how about you?

Mourning dove

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use GRASS and DOVE in a Haiku poem.  I live in a wooded area and love the song of doves. Their simple coos bring quiet to my soul. Perhaps you experience the same. ♥ 

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku.