Laughter’s gift

Every week author Ronovan Hester invites readers to participate in a Haiku challenge. This week he provided these two words as prompts: easy and ride. Not so surprisingly, my first thought was the movie, Easy Rider. As images of the film floated past, I found myself thinking about my youth on the farm. 

I thought of my mom and how she managed to create a home for her brood of seven. We had none of the luxuries of the “city” folk, but we had something only mom could provide. She is the focus of today’s Haiku. 

Remembering…

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use FEATHER and SCREAM in a Haiku poem.  These two words brought me back to youth, my own and that of my kids. We knew how to play when we were young. Maybe we need more pillow fights.  

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku.

Communication

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use QUESTION and ANSWER in a Haiku poem.  My thoughts focused on communication and our collective failure. It is as though we have lost the ability to simply be honest with one another. What is it that we fear? 

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku.

Fierce Storm

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use FIERCE  and STORM in a Haiku poem. I chose to use the words to describe a common interpersonal situation. Unfortunately, the political climate is such that the divides are deep and the anger overwhelming. I’m not sure what can bridge those differences. 

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku. 

Do and Say

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use DO  and SAY in a Haiku poem. I chose an embattled topic for my haiku. Though I pose a problem with no easy answers, my hope is that someday we won’t have a need for secrets. 

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku. 

Man and Magic

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use MAN  and MAGIC in a Haiku poem. My thoughts of recent have focused on the weather. Its unpredictability and ferocity can change lives. And yet, often hidden in its fury is extraordinary beauty. My Haiku is about that reality.

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku. 

He Said, She Said

Author Colleen Chesebro offers a weekly poetry challenge, using the 5/7/5/7/7 syllable structure.  The words for this week are Cold and Storm. By her rules, a participant cannot use these two words but must use synonyms.

This is my first attempt at writing Tanka, and I’ve chosen to use Tempest and Chill. Thank you, author Jan Sikes for your encouragement and inspiration.

Question and Answer

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use QUESTION and ANSWER in a Haiku poem. My thoughts quickly went to politicians whose disingenuous questions often elicit reactions that divide and demoralize. I can’t help but believe that the internal walls that we construct are graver than the exterior walls we might consider.   

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku. 

Sage and Vine

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use SAGE and VINE in a Haiku poem.  I live in a verdant area, and I dearly love seeing cottages covered with vines. Perhaps you think similarly. My poem attempts to capture the wonder of nature’s beauty.  ♥ 

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku. This pinterest photo delights my soul, how about you?

Mourning dove

This week author Ronovan Hester challenges writers to use GRASS and DOVE in a Haiku poem.  I live in a wooded area and love the song of doves. Their simple coos bring quiet to my soul. Perhaps you experience the same. ♥ 

If you’d like to try your hand at this art form, just click on Ronovan’s name, and you’ll be taken to his site, where there is helpful information on writing Haiku.